Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Best Games: Once Upon a Time



First up in the Best Games for the Classroom Series, we have Once Upon a Time, a card game that has been popular for a long time.  In fact, it won awards for being such a great game, including a Parent's Choice Award last year.  It inspires the imagination and can be a great way to help students hone writing skills, understand story elements, and explore the fantasy genre.

The object of the game is to use a deck of cards, each showing a story element, to collaboratively tell a story with the rest of the players.  You want to be the first to get rid of all your cards, but you have to do so by describing a story element using the cards in your possession.  At various times, other players can interrupt the narrative and continue it themselves, trying to get rid of their own cards.  Players have to think fast and rely not only on their knowledge of storytelling and fairy tales, but also their own ingenuity to win.  Each player has one card with a possible "ending" to the story, so each player is jostling to try to manipulate the story to their own end and get rid of their cards first.  

From the Parents-Choice.org site:

"Once Upon a Time requires attention and problem solving abilities as the players try to figure out when they might be able to interrupt the current storyteller. It also draws upon players' creativity and imagination as they attempt to expand the plot and develop characters."
 
Check out the publisher's list of how the game can be useful for students.

The game can get silly and fun, as seen in the video below.  There are also versions of the game where players can make their own deck with elements they choose and draw themselves.  Students can add their own favorite characters, original characters or silly elements to that type of deck.  

The storytelling possibilities are endless with this game.  Watch below to see how players have to think, create a story, and cleverly find ways to use the story elements in their hand:



New Series: Best Games for the Classroom





It's no secret that I love games.  I've posted about several throughout the blog, whether they are original games or adaptations of popular games.  Either way, games are a great way to help students learn and practice skills.

Many students love the occasional opportunity to play games straight off the shelves.  In a classroom setting, it's a good idea to use these games to reinforce what they're learning.

That's why the latest series on the blog will deal with games and ones I recommend to help students think, ponder, practice and use skills we want to see them show all the time.  Games are a great way for kids to show "the ability to think through and solve complex problems, or interact critically through language or media."

Stay tuned!

Thursday, April 3, 2014

8 Ways to Get Students Excited About Reading






Are you looking for some ways to envigorate your students' desire to read, and get them excited to crack open some books?
I've come across several creative ways to get your class motivated to read.  Take a look and see which would be the best fit for your class:


  • Flashlight Friday, which is a great idea I saw on HeadOverHeels' blog.  She has bought small flashlights and finger flashlights at dollar stores and, as a treat, students may use them on Fridays with the lights turned off.  The classroom is aglow with students silently reading with their little flashlights hovering over their books.  How awesome!



  • I absolutely love this idea for a Book Raffle!  The BrownBag and 4thGradeFrolics had an excellent idea to promote new books in the classroom library.  They describe the new books to students, and then allow them to participate in a raffle to see who gets to read the books first.  What a great contest to get students salivating over new books!

  • Speaking of new books, 2ndisoutofthisworld has a "new book box" that showcases new books when they are introduced to the classroom.  Once the kids to have a chance to read the books, they are added to the regular classroom library and replaced by newer books.  Cool system!  The kids will know right where to look to find something fresh to read.

  • HeadOverHeels also has a great printout for having students sign books to recommend them to the rest of their classmates.  Few things are more motivating for young readers than to have them open a book to see several of their classmates read and enjoyed the same book.


  • Young students may really enjoy making a book buddy to read to during reading time.  These cute creations can be made by students or the teacher.  I've also seen teachers buy small, cheap stuffed dolls to use as book buddies.

  • One final suggestion from HeadOverHeels (great blog, btw!):  A Reading Counts Contest allows them to enter a drawing to win a great prize.  They earn tickets for the contest by, you guessed it, reading books!  The more books they read, the more they increase their chances to win.

  • Lastly, Scholastic features a helpful list so that you can suggest book types based on students' interest, personalities and the genres they like.


Hopefully, this list helps you discover a few ways to make reading and finding new books a fun, rewarding experience for your class!  :-)

Friday, November 23, 2012

Three Math Activities for the Christmas Season



You can spread a little holiday cheer in your winter math lessons.  There are a ton of ideas out there to enliven math class during the last few days of the semester, and get everyone in the mood for Christmas.

  • Create Christmas trees in the cute coordinate graphic activity.  This teacher had a wonderful winter bulletin board full of these decorated Christmas trees and fireplaces.  It's a good way to have them practice graphing as well as making their own artwork.
  • How acute is students' spatial intelligence?  Test it out with this Snowflake Math Activity, which challenges them to anticipate which design will result from cuts on piece of paper.  It's taking the handy old paper snowflake technique and making it much more complex.
  • Speaking of snowflakes, have you ever heard of a 6-Sided Kirigami Snowflake?  MathCraft shows you how to make one.  They are signed to reflect the hexagonal symmetry of real snowflakes.  Picture tutorial included.

Have you seen more math lessons that are great for this time of year?



Christmas trees,holidays,special occasions,stars,ornaments,lights,decorative elements,traditional

Time-Telling Games




A few websites offer practice with telling time and reading clocks:

  • Students can Stop The Clock and record the time displayed. 
  • Can they tell the difference between two times?  Test their skills by playing another game on the same website. 
  • They can also play Bang on the Clock to stop the clock at the correct time.  Adjust the clock hands' speed to make it more challenging.

clocks,households,office,Photographs,times

Three Hands-On Geometry Activities



Turn geometry lessons into creative opportunities for students to learn while they build, manipulate and create.  I found three cool resources for hands-on geometry activities that you might like to add to workstations, your classroom project roster, or enrichment lessons. 

  • A great place to start for geometry activities is the MathCraft Wiki Page, which has dozens of projects that explore geometric principles.  Many of the suggestions there are eye-catching and complex, so this would be a good resource for gifted students.  Help students strengthen their spatial intelligence by challenging them to create icosahedral planet ornaments, these cool and colorful paper polyhedra, fractal cupcakes or any number of the ideas listed on the site.  Each project contains a step-by-step tutorial.

  • Miss Calculate posted this geometry sort on her blog, which helped her students work with triangles, bisectors, medians, etc.  I'm a big fan of sorting!  She asked her students to take their cards and sort them into piles.  Later, after they came up with a different number of piles, she explained that they should have five piles.  She then had them place their cards under the correct labels.  Geometry lesson with no paper and pencil required!

  • Construct a tetrahedral kite using little more than straws, a string and some tape.  This includes a step-by-step guide with photos.


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Wednesday, November 21, 2012

3 Algebra Activities for Beginners

Turning algebra practice into engaging activities is sometimes a hard task.  Thankfully, a few places offer work your students can do to enhance their math skills without staring at a math textbook or worksheet.

Mrs. W's Math Connection showed her students that they can make "edible equations" by solving their equations in the form of burgers.  She displayed their yummy-looking algebra sandwiches as a classroom display. 

Her class also created their own water parks as a means of working with slope and linear equations.  Check out her class working on their ideas and their finished projects, which look awesome!  The project is available for free on a TeachersPayTeachers site!

There is also Vector Kids' Online Variable Game, which challenges students with basic algebraic questions to solve for "x."  They can choose which operation to use and how high their problems can go.  How many can they solve in one minute?